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The distribution of transport information

A special division was set up at the DPMB Transport Department in March 2015 to deal with the distribution of transport information (DTI). What led to this move and how does the division work?
 
Long-term plans to set up a division to ensure the distribution of up-to-date information to the public were accelerated as a result of last year’s black ice calamity in December. The absence of such a division had become all the more marked in these fast times of communication and information technology. Another important impulse was the introduction of electronic information boards at stops. All this interface between us and the outside world demands real time operation. The office of the distribution of transport information division is located in a partly-separated area that is part of the operations centre (“radio room”) for the traffic management office (transport dispatching) at the DPMB building at Novobranská 18.
 
What do DTI workers actually do? They constantly monitor news from radio equipment and evaluate the information received, meaning whether it is something “banal” such as finding or checking any follow-on effect, whether a vehicle is at a standstill, thus disrupting the timetable, or whether there has been a serious accident that will affect local public transport operation for several hours. As soon as the driver passes the first information on to the dispatcher, he/she must decide whether to make the extraordinary incident public and if so, when, to whom and using which channels so that it reaches only those passengers affected and does not bother everyone else. DTI workers almost continually maintain the Extraordinary incidents section at dpmb.cz, prepare material for cooperating radio stations (Hitradio Magic Brno and Radio Petrov) and send news to electronic information boards.
 
The work of DTI staff covers daytime service hours, meaning 5 am to 11 pm, from 6 am at weekends. The office is always run by a single member of staff from the operations preparation department at the Transport Division, who works out of the building in Novobranská Street on his/her shift and not his/her “home” office in Pisárky. What is more, working with information for passengers is more or less routine for those that prepare operations. By contrast, dispatchers (operation management operators) are able to fully devote themselves to getting operation back on track as quickly as possible or to ensuring effective transport measures are taken without being bogged down by the need to provide information.
 
What do DTI workers actually do? They constantly monitor news from radio equipment and evaluate the information received, meaning whether it is something “banal” such as finding or checking any follow-on effect, whether a vehicle is at a standstill, thus disrupting the timetable, or whether there has been a serious accident that will affect local public transport operation for several hours. As soon as the driver passes the first information on to the dispatcher, he/she must decide whether to make the extraordinary incident public and if so, when, to whom and using which channels so that it reaches only those passengers affected and does not bother everyone else. DTI workers almost continually maintain the Extraordinary incidents section at dpmb.cz, prepare radio announcements and send news to electronic information boards.
 
It is also important to be aware that an accident in one part of Brno might impact on the regularity of transport on the other side of the city in an hour’s time and that information sent to information boards, for example, must be properly timed and directed according to this. We process around one-tenth of extraordinary incidents during a shift and around half of these are made public using one or other of the channels of information. Extraordinary incidents are most common on work days during the morning and afternoon rush.
 
Linka x mimo provoz
Linka x mimo provoz
Linka x mimo provoz
 
Photo: archive DPMB, a.s.